Epoxy Resin Painting Series

Resin is such a powerful medium that it takes on a life of its own. I feel I am the bystander watching this powerful fluid push and pull paint and texture around the canvas.

Gestural Abstraction through Epoxy Resin

Epoxy resin is a very difficult material to work with, and it takes considerable experience to properly use this hazardous material – though once properly cured, it is harmless. Judy uses epoxy resin in her artwork to achieve unique color and textures in her abstract paintings. She started incorporating epoxy resin into her original abstract paintings after much thought and research.

For several years, I’ve been drawn to epoxy resin – its beautiful thick shiny coat and the way it can enhance color. I began researching epoxy resin, ordered the chemical, along with hardener, and started exploring its use. That’s when my fondness for this medium deepened. It is extremely seductive while wet and is a wonderful complement to my style of expression. It’s a new and exciting way for me to connect intrinsically and extrinsically with my creative energy and paintings, and reminds me of the illusion of control.

Judy’s journey into epoxy resin was not easy, and there was a lot of trial and error, but it all came together beautifully.

I started by covering paintings with a thin coat and progressed to shooting the medium around my paintings with a heat gun. I discovered, after tossing out several ruined attempts, that I could add paint and move it around with the heat gun. I have experimented with several paints, including oil, acrylic, water and enamel. I believe oil works the best.  When I began, I thought I could divine its essence and wield it to fit my intentions; however, I quickly learned that resin is such a powerful medium that it takes on a life of its own.  I feel I am the bystander watching this powerful fluid push and pull paint and texture around the canvas.

Epoxy resin paintings require a horizontal surface, so Judy creates her original paintings on saw horses, with the canvas parallel to the ground.  This is different than many of her other paintings, which are created perpendicular to the ground.   After rapidly mixing the epoxy with the hardener, she pours it on the canvas and then adds paint.  The paint and epoxy mixture is moved around the canvas with heat guns and palette knives, along with the use gravity, moving the medium around the canvas, creating exciting (and sometimes meditative and minimal) paintings.

Epoxy resin is an extremely dangerous chemical while wet, so Judy wears a protective suit and breathes pure air through an air respirator hood while working on her contemporary abstract art paintings.

Judy must work fast once the mixture is mixed and poured since resin changes texture in a short period of time.  She applies many layers of resin to each abstract art painting, which takes several days to complete and cure.  The demands of this constantly changing medium keeps things interesting and challenging, resulting in a wide array of possibilities in texture, depth, and color.  Some of the resin paintings are minimal, while the black and white ones are more expressive.

Close up of an epoxy resin series painting, 1

Close up of an epoxy resin series painting, 2